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4th international workshop on Social Data on the Web (SDoW2011)

Bonn (Germany), October 23, 2011

News

Oct 09, 2011:
Program online
Sep 19, 2011:
Proceedings published
Sep 06, 2011:
List of accepted papers published
Aug 20, 2011:
Submissions closed
Aug 14, 2011:
Submissions deadline extended to Aug 19
Jul 29, 2011:
Date confirmed: Oct 23
Jul 11, 2011:
2nd Call for Papers sent
May 30, 2011:
Call for Papers is out!
May 15, 2011:
Workshop selected to be held as part of ISWC 2011

Program

Full proceedings are available both at CEUR-WS and as a single file.

Proceedings of the 4th Social Data on the Web workshop (SDoW2011)
Time Presentation Type
9:00-9:15 Workshop Introduction
Alexandre Passant, Sergio Fernández, John Breslin, and Uldis Bojārs
9:15-10:00 User Modeling and Personalization on Twitter (slides)
Fabian Abel
keynote
10:00-10:30 Social Semantic Web Access Control (abstract, slides)
Serena Villata Nicolas Delaforge Fabien Gandon Amelie Gyrard

In the Social Web, the users are invited to publish a lot of personal information. These information can be easily retrieved, and sometimes reused, without providing the users with fine-grained access control mechanisms able to restrict the access to their profiles, and re- sources. In this paper, we present an access control model for the Social Semantic Web. Our model is grounded on the Social Semantic SPARQL Security for Access Control Ontology. This ontology can be used by the users to define, thanks to an Access Control Manager, their own terms of access to the data. Moreover, the Access Control Manager allows to check, after a query, to which extent the data is available, depending on the user’s profile. The evaluation of the access conditions is related to different features, such as social tags, contextual information, being part of a group, and relationships with the data provider.

full paper
10:30-11:00 Coffee break
11:00-11:30 Towards Mining Semantic Maturity in Social Bookmarking Systems (abstract, slides)
Martin Atzmueller, Dominik Benz, Andreas Hotho and Gerd Stumme

The existence of emergent semantics within social metadata (such as tags in bookmarking systems) has been proven by a large number of successful approaches making the implicit semantic structures explicit. However, much less attention has been given to the factors which influence the “maturing” process of these structures over time. A natural hypoth- esis is that tags become semantically more and more mature whenever many users use them in the same contexts. This would allow to describe a tag by a specific and informative “semantic fingerprint” in the context of tagged resoures. However, the question of assessing the quality of such fingerprints has been seldomly addressed. In this paper, we provide a systematic approach of mining semantic ma- turity profiles within folksonomy-based tag properties. Our ultimate goal is to provide a characterization of “mature tags”. Additionally, we con- sider semantic information about the tags as a gold-standard source for the characterization of the collected results. Our initial results suggest that a suitable composition of tag properties allows the identification of more mature tag subsets. The presented work has implications for a num- ber of problems related to social tagging systems, including tag ranking, tag recommendation, and the capturing of light-weight ontologies from tagging data.

full paper
11:30-12:00 Semantic Annotation from Social Data (abstract, slides)
Geir Solskinnsbakk and Jon Atle Gulla

Folksonomies can be viewed as large sources of informal se- mantics. Folksonomy tags can be interpreted as concepts that can be extracted from the social data and used as a basis for creating semantic structures. In the folksonomy the connection between these concepts and the tagged resources are explicit. However, to effectively use the extracted conceptual structures it is important to be able to find connections be- tween the concepts and not only the already tagged documents, but also new documents that have not previously been seen. Thus, we present in this paper an automatic approach for annotating documents with con- cepts extracted from social data. This is based on representing each tag’s semantics with a tag signature. The tag signature is then used to generate the annotations of documents. We present an evaluation of the approach which shows promising results towards automatic annotation of textual documents.

full paper
12:00-12:30 Volatile Classification of Point of Interests based on Social Activity Streams (abstract, slides)
Amparo E. Cano, Andrea Varga and Fabio Ciravegna

In the Social Web, the users are invited to publish a lot of personal information. These information can be easily retrieved, and sometimes reused, without providing the users with fine-grained access control mechanisms able to restrict the access to their profiles, and re- sources. In this paper, we present an access control model for the Social Semantic Web. Our model is grounded on the Social Semantic SPARQL Security for Access Control Ontology. This ontology can be used by the users to define, thanks to an Access Control Manager, their own terms of access to the data. Moreover, the Access Control Manager allows to check, after a query, to which extent the data is available, depending on the user’s profile. The evaluation of the access conditions is related to different features, such as social tags, contextual information, being part of a group, and relationships with the data provider.

full paper
12:30-14:00 Lunch break
14:00-14:30 Pragmatic metadata matters: How data about the usage of data effects semantic user models (abstract, slides)
Claudia Wagner, Markus Strohmaier and Yulan He

Online social media such as wikis, blogs or message boards enable large groups of users to generate and socialize around content. With increasing adoption of such media, the number of users interacting with user-generated content grows and as a result also the amount of pragmatic metadata - i.e. data about the usage of content - grows. The aim of this work is to compare different methods for learning topical user profiles from Social Web data and to explore if and how pragmatic metadata has an effect on the quality of semantic user models. Since accurate topical user profiles are required by many applications such as recommender systems or expert search engines, learning such models by observing content and activities around content is an appealing idea. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that demonstrates an effect between pragmatic metadata on one hand, and the quality of semantic user models based on user-generated content on the other. Our results suggest that not all types of pragmatic metadata are equally useful for acquiring accurate semantic user models, and some types of pragmatic metadata can even have detrimental effects.

full paper
14:30-15:00 Semantic Technologies to Support the User-Centric Analysis of Activity Data (abstract, slides)
Mathieu D'Aquin, Salman Elahi and Enrico Motta

There is currently a trend in giving access to users of on- line services to their own data. In this paper, we consider in particular the data which is generated from the interaction between a user and an organisation online: activity data as held in websites and Web applica- tions logs. We show how we use semantic technologies including RDF integration of log data, SPARQL and lightweight ontology reasoning to aggregate, integrate and analyse activity data from a user-centric point of view.

full paper
15:00-15:30 Social Network Aggregation Using Face-Recognition (abstract, slides)
Patrick Minder, and Abraham Bernstein

With the rapid growth of the social web an increasing num- ber of people started to replicate their off-line preferences and lives in an on-line environment. Consequently, the social web provides an enormous source for social network data, which can be used in both commercial and research applications. However, people often take part in multiple social network sites and, generally, they share only a selected amount of data to the audience of a specific platform. Consequently, the interlink- age of social graphs from different sources getting increasingly impor- tant for applications such as social network analysis, personalization, or recommender systems. This paper proposes a novel method to enhance available user re-identification systems for social network data aggrega- tion based on face-recognition algorithms. Furthermore, the method is combined with traditional text-based approaches in order to attempt a counter-balancing of the weaknesses of both methods. Using two sam- ples of real-world social networks (with 1610 and 1690 identities each) we show that even though a pure face-recognition based method gets out- performed by the traditional text-based method (area under the ROC curve 0.986 vs. 0.938) the combined method significantly outperforms both of these (0.998, p = 0.0001) suggesting that the face-based method indeed carries complimentary information to raw text attributes.

full paper
15:30-15:50 Using SKOS to Integrate Social Networking Sites with Scholarly Information Portals (abstract, slides)
Arnim Bleier , Benjamin Zapilko , Mark Thamm and Peter Mutschke

Web 2.0 platforms have become a ubiquitous way of information ex- change, but are seldom integrated with the Web of Data. To overcome this situation we propose the usage of SKOS thesauri acting as back-of-the-book index providing domain-specific axes transcending applications. We illustrate this concept with a use-case in the social sciences domain but applications in other domains are possible.

poster paper
16:00-16:30 Coffee break
16:30-16:50 LexiTags: An Interlingua for the Social Semantic Web (abstract, slides)
Csaba Veres

The paper describes lexitags, a new approach to social semantic tagging whose goal is to allow users to easily enrich resources with semantic metadata from WordNet. This is a paradigm example of the Social Web and the Semantic Web working together: ordinary users help create the metadata so needed by the Semantic Web and in turn, Semantic Web technologies help those users get a richer experience from the Social Web. A family of simple user interfaces for lexitagging is described, as are some methods for the subsequent, automatic generation of lightweight ontologies. These ontologies are presented as an ideal interlingua for the Social Semantic Web.

short paper
16:50-17:10 Linked Opinions: Describing Sentiments on the Structured Web of Data (abstract, slides)
Adam Westerski, Carlos A. Iglesias and Fernando Tapia Rico

In the paper we report on the results of our experiments on the construction of the opinion ontology. Our aim is to show the benefits of publishing in the open, on the Web, the results of the opinion mining process in a structured form. On the road to achieving this, we attempt to answer the research question to what extent opinion information can be formalized in a unified way. Furthermore, as part of the evaluation, we experiment with the usage of Semantic Web technologies and show particular use cases that support our claims.

short paper
17:10-18:00 Social Semantic Web: What Next? panel

Aim and scope

The 4th international workshop Social Data on the Web (SDoW2011), co-located with the 10th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC2011) , aims to bring together researchers, developers and practitioners involved in semantically-enhancing social media websites, as well as academics researching more formal aspect of these interactions between the Semantic Web and Social Web.

It is now widely agreed in the community that the Semantic Web and the Social Web can benefit from each other. One the one hand, the speed at which data is being created on the Social Web is growing at exponential rate. Recent statistics showed that about 100 million Tweets are created per day and that Facebook has now 500 million users. Yet, some issues still have to be tackled, such as how to efficiently make sense of all this data, how to ensure trust and privacy on the Social Web, how to interlink data from different systems, whether it is on the Web or in the enterprise, or more recently, how to link Social Network and sensor networks to enable Semantic Citizen Sensing.

Following the successful SDoW workshops at ISWC 2008, 2009 and 2010, this workshop will tackle these various topics and aims at bringing together researchers and practitioners, as in the 3 previous editions. We aim to bring together Semantic Web experts and Web 2.0 practitioners and users to discuss the application of semantic technologies to data from the Social Web. It is motivated by recent active developments in collaborative and social software and their Semantic Web counterparts, notably in the industry, such as FaceBook Open Graph Protocol.

Topics of Interest

We encourage contributions which will describe research proposals or implementations that deal with (but are not limited to) the following topics of interest:

  • Applications and tools using Social Semantic Web technologies
  • Creating RDF-based knowledge using social media services
  • Data Portability and Social Network Portability
  • Emerging semantic platforms for the Social Web
  • Enriching Social Web with semantic data - RDFa, microdata, microformats and other approaches
  • Linked Data on the Social Web - providing linked data from social media sites
  • Mining and analysis of Social Data
  • Ontologies for the Social Web - developing, using and extending lightweight ontologies for social media sites
  • Querying and mining social semantic data
  • Policies, authentication, security, and trust within collaborative scenarios
  • Citizen Sensing and the Semantic Web
  • Social Networks and Sensor Networks
  • Legal aspects of the Social Semantic Web
  • Large scale data mining and reasoning over large social media datasets
  • Domain-specific social network (e-business, HCLS, etc.) and Semantic Web
  • Social Semantic Web and disaster/emergency management

Submissions

The following types of contributions are welcomed:

  • Full technical papers, up to 12 pages.
  • Short technical papers and position papers, up to 6 pages.
  • Posters and Demos, 2-3 pages with a description of the application, ideally accompanied with a link to an online demo.

Paper submissions will have to be formatted in the style of the Springer Publications format for Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS). Submissions will be made using EasyChair Conference System, and proceedings of the papers are provided by CEUR-WS.

Important dates

Abstracts deadline:
Aug 15, 2011 (23:59 pm Hawaii time, GMT-10)
Submission deadline:
Aug 19, 2011 (23:59 pm Hawaii time, GMT-10)
 
 
Notification of acceptance:
Sep 05, 2011
Camera-ready paper submission:
Sep 15, 2011
Camera-ready proceedings:
Oct 07, 2011Sep 19, 2011
Workshop:
Oct 23, 2011

Workshop Organization

The workshop will be co-located with the 10th ISWC in Bonn (Germany), and will be held on October 23, 2011.

The workshop will consist of a short opening session followed by a keynote talk and paper presentations, a format that has been proven to be successful in the previous editions. Networked communication (Twitter, IRC) will also be encouraged during the workshop with a particular hashtag (#sdow2011) so that people can follow the related conversations.

Workshop Chairs

Program Committee

  • Alessandra Toninelli, Research & Innovation Division of the Engineering Group, Italy
  • Axel Ngonga, Universität Leipzig, Germany
  • Chris Bizer, FUB, Germany
  • Dan Brickley, FOAF project & Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Daniel Gayo-Avello, University of Oviedo, Spain
  • Daniel Schwabe, PUC Rio, Brasil
  • Diego Berrueta, Fundación CTIC, Spain
  • Emanuele Della Valle, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
  • Fabien Gandon, INRIA, France
  • Gunnar Aastrand Grimnes, DFKI Knowledge Management Lab, Germany
  • Harry Halpin, University of Edinburgh / W3C, UK
  • Henry Story, Apache Software Foundation, France
  • Irene Celino, CEFRIEL, Italy
  • Jose E. Labra, University of Oviedo, Spain
  • Libby Miller, BBC, UK
  • Matthew Rowe, University of Sheffield, UK
  • Michael Hausenblas, DERI, NUI Galway Ireland
  • Mischa Tuffield, Garlik, UK
  • Olaf Hartig, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany
  • Oscar Corcho, UPM, Spain
  • Pablo López, Treelogic, Spain
  • Pablo Mendes, Kno.e.sis, Wright State University, USA
  • Richard Cyganiak, DERI, NUI Galway, Ireland
  • Sebastian Tramp, Universität Leipzig, Germany
  • Sheila Kinsella, DERI, NUI Galway
  • Sofia Angeletou, KMi, The Open University, UK
  • Steve Harris, Garlik, UK
  • Yves Raimond, BBC, UK

Venue

The workshop is hosted by the ISWC 2011 conference in Bonn (Germany), so it shares the same venue. Therefore attendees must pay the ISWC 2011 workshop registration fees, as well as the conference registration fees. At the main conference Web page you can find more information about how to travel or accomodation close to the conference venue.

Contact

For further information, please send an email to: sdow [dot] team [at] gmail [dot] com